Warm-season fragile perennial chayote. When the weather has warmed up in the spring, plant the full fruit 3 to 4 weeks after the last average date of frost. Chayote thrives best in tropical or subtropical areas with very warm to scorching summers. For chayote to be ready for harvest, 120 to 150 frost-free days are needed. The chayote vine yields a flattened, green-to-wʜɪᴛe fruit with a nutty flavour that resembles a squash. A tuberous root produces stems that resemble vines and can extend up to 50 feet (15.2) in length. Both the male and female flowers are produced on the same vine, and the leaves are hairy and resemble maple leaves. Fruit, mature tubers, and young shoots can all be eaten.

Planting Chayote
Chayote should be grown in direct sunlight; while it can survive in little shade, its yield will be reduced. The optimum soil for chayote growth is one that is loose, biologically rich, and well-drained, but moisture-retentive. Chayote likes soil with a pH between 6.0 and 6.8.

Planting time. Planting season When the soil temperature has reached at least 65°F (18°c) and it is 3 to 4 weeks after the last average date of frost, plant chayote. In tropical or subtropical regions with mild to sweltering summers, such as Florida, the Gulf Coast, and California, chayote thrives. Chayote needs 120 to 150 warm, frost-free days to mature and be ready for harvest. In regions with short summers, chayote should be cultivated in pots so that it may be brought within when the weather turns cool.

Planting and spacing. Place a complete chayote fruit flat end down, at an angle so that the stem end is just level with the soil surface and 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 cm) deep. Ten feet apart, sow seeds or fruits. Chayote is a strong climber; before planting, place a solid trellis or support in place. Avoid letting ripening fruit come in contact with soil since it will rot and germinate while still on the vine.

Container growing. In a container, chayote can be grown, although the yield won’t be very high. It is recommended to cultivate chayote in a pot that is 24 inches deep. A trellis or other support should be placed in the container at planting time because a chayote is an aggressive climber.

Harvesting and Storing Chayote
Harvest. growing in containers. In a container, chayote can be grown, although the yield won’t be very high. A trellis or other support should be placed in the container at planting time because a chayote is an aggressive climber.

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Video resource: Noal Farm